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Top 10 things Hiring Managers really want from you during an interview…

10 October 2016

After ironing your lucky shirt and practicing interview questions over and over again you may feel well prepared for your interview however, there are certain factors that you must consider to impress the Hiring Manager and give yourself a competitive advantage over other applicants.

Arrive on time

Timing is everything - don’t be late! As this is the first impression the Hiring Manager will have of you, it shouldn't be negative. When you know the address of where your interview will take place, check the traffic conditions, consider the weather and plan your route. If you’re early, take some time before the interview to practice some questions or maybe even go for a walk around the area. The best time to arrive is 5-10 minutes before the interview. 

Research 

Know your stuff! If you want the job, you need to do some research into the company. If you’ve not done your research how can you expect the Hiring Manager to believe that you’re genuinely interested in working for the business? Look up the company website to understand how they work, what the core values and mission of the business are. You can also look at the social media profiles to gain further insight into the culture. If they are a consumer business, go into a store that sells their products and look through their product range as well as competitors products. Also look at what they do well and what they could do better.

Capability 

Give examples of how you have demonstrated the behaviours/skills required - this will allow the Hiring Manager to determine if you’re the right person for the role. The Hiring Manager is looking out for someone that can bring something special to the business; explain why you want the job and what you can bring.

Relevant experience 

The recommended way to talk through your experience is a step by step manner using the STAR (Situation, Task, Action, Result) technique. This technique should be used when you’re asked to give an example of a certain situation. Remember to mention your achievements and what you did to achieve these.

Cultural fit

You need to show the Hiring Manager that your personality fits in with the company culture. Tell them about what you enjoy doing in your spare time and what your hobbies are. What you choose to talk about shows how comfortable you are and your ability to build rapport. The Hiring Manager can then identify whether they and others in the business can get along with you on a daily basis.

Honesty
Above anything the Hiring Manager wants to know what sort of person you are; show the real you, don’t pretend to be someone you’re not just to get the job. Have a clear understanding of your strengths and weaknesses and give genuine answers of how you dealt with any struggles and challenges in previous roles.

Attention

Listen! Pay attention to what the Hiring Manager is saying, not only will this help you better understand the business, it will help with tailoring your responses and answers according to what they are looking for. You’ll also be able to figure out if the role is actually right for you, and whether you can see yourself working there.

Enthusiasm

You need to have a genuine passion for the role and business which needs to be clearly expressed during the interview. Be polite and friendly, not just to the Hiring Manager but to anyone else you meet when there. Showing enthusiasm and presenting yourself correctly plays a big part in the recruitment process.

Good communication skills

As the Hiring Manager needs to judge whether you can portray the business in the right way, always stay professional during the interview. Communicate in a clear and concise manner and keep your answers to the point.

Ask questions

Hiring Managers like it when you come prepared to an interview. You should have at least two questions to ask, but you need to make sure you ask the right questions. Your questions can be based on the company’s future plans, the people/team you’ll be working with or the company culture. Example questions you could ask:

  • If selected, how could I best contribute to this role?
  • How does this role fit into the larger objectives of the department and company?
  • Can you describe some of the specific responsibilities or describe a typical day?

If you have need support with interview preparation or have any questions, simply get in touch with your consultant on 08452 000 741.

Keep a look out for our next blog on the ‘Top 10 things not to do during an interview!’

Good luck!

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